Webgazing

Science from and for the internet

Posts tagged Science

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Longest-running experiment gets a fast forward - physics-math - 02 July 2014 - New Scientist

             

Oh hai tumblr. I saw this and thought of you. Remember my post in… erm… 2012… gee that was a long time ago. Remember the world’s longest running experiment: the pitch drop? This is a variation on that one using much lower viscosity pitch - 30 times less - which can be run over months rather than decades. It’s pretty cool to see a faster version.

Oh, me?

Where have I been? I’ve spent the last 9 months trying to figure out how to be a PhD student. It’s mad and awesome and really hard work, but I like it. Maybe I’ll share some things with you. Radiation biology is pretty cool.

Filed under oh hai tumblr back again pitch tar science life update phd

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poptech:

austinkleon:

Join Cartoonist Lynda Barry for a University-Level Course on Doodling and Neuroscience

Can I just stop you for a minute and note how fucking amazing it is that one of our greatest living cartoonists is not only teaching this class, but she’s letting us all follow along? Incredible.

Love it. Exploring complex ideas visually is why Peter Durand draws during PopTech talks.

I have absolutely no talent at drawing but I’d take this class.

I’ll be following along at thenearsightedmonkey.tumblr.com

(via laughterkey)

Filed under Lynda Barray Doodling Neuroscience Science Art University

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skeptv:

Biofilm: A New (Gross) Thing to Worry About

via scishow:

Slime can be great, but when it’s the wrong kind of slime (you know, the kind that can kill you?), it gets added to the list of things Hank wishes he didn’t have to worry about.  Scientists call it biofilm, and it’s a type of bacterial colony that produces a sticky organic glue which anchors the organisms to each other and to whatever surface they fancy. 

References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-381R

Biofilms! This is one of the topics I’m studying for my Infection and Immunity exam next week. (Last one of the semester, hooray!)

These are a huge problem in patient with Cystic Fibrosis and can make opportinistic bacterial infections like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which loves to infect medical devices like respirators and catheters, really difficult to treat.

And yes, be glad they didn’t include any pictures…

(Source: youtube.com, via scientiflix)

Filed under science biology bacteria biofilms education hank green

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Natural Histories: Extraordinary Rare Book Selections from the American Museum of Natural History Library
From Brainpickings: 
…an extraordinary collection of works from the Rare Book Room and Rare Book Collections of the American Museum of Natural History’s Research Library, spanning five centuries of anthropology, astronomy, earth science, paleontology, and zoology representing all seven continents. Each highlighted work is accompanied by a short essay exploring its significance, what makes it rare — scarcity, uniqueness, age, binding type, size, value, or nature of the illustrations — and its place in natural history.

Natural Histories: Extraordinary Rare Book Selections from the American Museum of Natural History Library


From Brainpickings

…an extraordinary collection of works from the Rare Book Room and Rare Book Collections of the American Museum of Natural History’s Research Library, spanning five centuries of anthropology, astronomy, earth science, paleontology, and zoology representing all seven continents. Each highlighted work is accompanied by a short essay exploring its significance, what makes it rare — scarcity, uniqueness, age, binding type, size, value, or nature of the illustrations — and its place in natural history.


Filed under Science History Illustration Nature Books Another one for my Christmas list

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I’m taking a small break from writing a literature review for my undergraduate research project to share this cool animation from Nature and Arkitek Studios that explains how small RNA moleculese, microRNAs, work with other proteins to regulate gene expression.

When I first heard about this I had one of those "OMG this is so awesome" moments which was one of the main reasons I chose my project subject.

This process was only discovered about 10 years ago, but I’d definitely call microRNAs a major theme in science at the moment, especially in molecular biology and cancer research. According to PubMed there were over 4000 papers published on the subject in 2011.

Filed under Science Biology Molecular Biology microRNAs RNA interference RNAi Animation

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afracturedreality:

Winner of Honorable Mention in Science’s Visualization Challenge, 2011.
Visual Science’s 3-D model of the Ebola virus is 10 times more complex than their HIV model. This intricate visualization includes 11 types of viral and human proteins, 18,900 nucleotides of genomic RNA and more than 2.5 million different lipid molecules. The Ebolavirus was first described in 1976 during the Zaire ebolavirus outbreaks in Africa. It’s one of the most lethal viruses on Earth - once patients are infected, they develop a severe form of hemorrhagic fever that has a fatality rate of almost 90% in some cases. There have also been some fatalities resulting from laboratory accidents. Ebolavirus is one of a handful of viruses that need to be contained in Level 4 Biohazard facilities, necessitating positive pressure personnel suits with a segregated air supplies.
By Ivan Konstantinov, Yury Stefanov, Alex Kovalevsky, Anastasya Bakulina and Kirill Grishanin from the Visual Science Company

A great illustration. 
The CDC’s Special Pathogens Branch (which I like to think is like the microbiology secret service) has lots of info if anyone fancies finding out more.

afracturedreality:

Winner of Honorable Mention in Science’s Visualization Challenge, 2011.

Visual Science’s 3-D model of the Ebola virus is 10 times more complex than their HIV model. This intricate visualization includes 11 types of viral and human proteins, 18,900 nucleotides of genomic RNA and more than 2.5 million different lipid molecules. The Ebolavirus was first described in 1976 during the Zaire ebolavirus outbreaks in Africa. It’s one of the most lethal viruses on Earth - once patients are infected, they develop a severe form of hemorrhagic fever that has a fatality rate of almost 90% in some cases. There have also been some fatalities resulting from laboratory accidents. Ebolavirus is one of a handful of viruses that need to be contained in Level 4 Biohazard facilities, necessitating positive pressure personnel suits with a segregated air supplies.

By Ivan Konstantinov, Yury Stefanov, Alex Kovalevsky, Anastasya Bakulina and Kirill Grishanin from the Visual Science Company

A great illustration. 

The CDC’s Special Pathogens Branch (which I like to think is like the microbiology secret service) has lots of info if anyone fancies finding out more.

(via sciencenote)

Filed under Ebola Viruses Microbiology Illustration Science

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Organelle Wars

I’ve been watching a fantastic bit of twitter-inclusive Biology teaching and science outreach over the past couple of weeks by an American high school teacher Mr Graba, in Palantine, IL. Inspired by the upcoming US elections, he has been getting his students to campaign for their chosen organelle, but more interestingly, to use Twitter to do this.

Some of the cell biologists on Twitter, including some at my own university in the UK, noticed this and started interacting with them and answering their questions. It’s created a great conversation between students and researchers that wouldn’t be possible if Twitter didn’t exist. Just one more reason why I love Twitter. And science.

Have a look at the storify of their campaigning curated by Anne Osterrieder, a plant cell biologist and post-doc at Oxford Brookes university. She’s @AnneOsterrieder on twitter. Some of the other biologists involved are @JohnRunions and @biochembelle

Check out #organellewars to see more. I love some of the “smear campaigns” being conducted too.

Today is election day, so we’ll have to watch to see who comes out on top.

As an aspiring cell biologist, I think it’s so important to get involved with school age students. The internet and social networks like Twitter make it easy to make science more open, so there really is no excuse not to expand our circles.

Filed under Organelle wars Biology Science Teaching Outreach Education Twitter Social Media Elections

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I’m a big fan of the intersection between art and science, this is a brilliant example from maykayart.wordpress.com.
May is a PhD student at the University of Heidelberg working on Alzheimer’s disease and in her spare time transforms these 3D protein structures into figures, animals or scenes. 
Name that protein. The one shown here is the core domain of the most famous tumour suppressor: p53.
Here’s what it looks like originally, from her chosen angle:

This is a great idea, a bit like seeing the shapes on constellations and joining the dots.

I’m a big fan of the intersection between art and science, this is a brilliant example from maykayart.wordpress.com.

May is a PhD student at the University of Heidelberg working on Alzheimer’s disease and in her spare time transforms these 3D protein structures into figures, animals or scenes. 

Name that protein. The one shown here is the core domain of the most famous tumour suppressor: p53.

Here’s what it looks like originally, from her chosen angle:

This is a great idea, a bit like seeing the shapes on constellations and joining the dots.

Filed under Protein art Science Art

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Wow. The aurora photographed by Stéphane Guisard. Via the Bad Astronomy blog at Discover.
One day I want to go and see this for myself. I have a feeling the picture doesn’t do it justice.
Knowing what causes it just makes it even more amazing. Imagine all those charged particles from the solar wind colliding with the earth’s magnetic field. Collision. Light. Magic.

Wow. The aurora photographed by Stéphane Guisard. Via the Bad Astronomy blog at Discover.

One day I want to go and see this for myself. I have a feeling the picture doesn’t do it justice.

Knowing what causes it just makes it even more amazing. Imagine all those charged particles from the solar wind colliding with the earth’s magnetic field. Collision. Light. Magic.

Filed under Aurora Photography Nature Science