Webgazing

Science from and for the internet

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Longest-running experiment gets a fast forward - physics-math - 02 July 2014 - New Scientist

             

Oh hai tumblr. I saw this and thought of you. Remember my post in… erm… 2012… gee that was a long time ago. Remember the world’s longest running experiment: the pitch drop? This is a variation on that one using much lower viscosity pitch - 30 times less - which can be run over months rather than decades. It’s pretty cool to see a faster version.

Oh, me?

Where have I been? I’ve spent the last 9 months trying to figure out how to be a PhD student. It’s mad and awesome and really hard work, but I like it. Maybe I’ll share some things with you. Radiation biology is pretty cool.

Filed under oh hai tumblr back again pitch tar science life update phd

838 notes

poptech:

austinkleon:

Join Cartoonist Lynda Barry for a University-Level Course on Doodling and Neuroscience

Can I just stop you for a minute and note how fucking amazing it is that one of our greatest living cartoonists is not only teaching this class, but she’s letting us all follow along? Incredible.

Love it. Exploring complex ideas visually is why Peter Durand draws during PopTech talks.

I have absolutely no talent at drawing but I’d take this class.

I’ll be following along at thenearsightedmonkey.tumblr.com

(via laughterkey)

Filed under Lynda Barray Doodling Neuroscience Science Art University

3,044 notes

jtotheizzoe:

Overly Honest Methods: Uncovering the hilarious truth behind how science actually gets done


Earlier this week, in a fit of comedic inspiration, a postdoc named Leigh tweeted a funny lab confession and included the hashtag #overlyhonestmethods. By the end of the day, dozens of scientists had joined in, and the result is nothing short of hilarious.

Science is an incredibly painstaking and difficult process, and in addition to being quite funny, these tweets pull back the curtain on just how human a process research really is. Some of them had me raising my eyebrows right after I finished giggling, because please tell me you didn’t actually do that. Others had me nodding sagely in agreement, because sometimes you drop a tube or run out of a chemical and the world has to keep on turning, man.

Check out this collection of 75 of the best, and Robert Gonzalez has picked quite a few gems at io9. What are your favorites? Got any confessions?

Oh so funny…

(via eatgeekstudy)

1,869 notes

bekindplzrewind:

jtotheizzoe:

How a molecular biologist proposes! So cute.
DNA amplified to different sized fragments via the polymerase chain reaction, and then seperated by size on a gel. This isn’t that hard actually. I just got a Valentine’s Day idea for my lady :) Time to design some romantic DNA.
I think more people should get creative with their science, no?
(via a very awesome person who uploaded this to imgur and should be married forever)

Yes. This is perfect. Adorably perfect.

Awwww…

bekindplzrewind:

jtotheizzoe:

How a molecular biologist proposes! So cute.

DNA amplified to different sized fragments via the polymerase chain reaction, and then seperated by size on a gel. This isn’t that hard actually. I just got a Valentine’s Day idea for my lady :) Time to design some romantic DNA.

I think more people should get creative with their science, no?

(via a very awesome person who uploaded this to imgur and should be married forever)

Yes. This is perfect. Adorably perfect.

Awwww…

(via scienceshenanigans)

58 notes

skeptv:

Biofilm: A New (Gross) Thing to Worry About

via scishow:

Slime can be great, but when it’s the wrong kind of slime (you know, the kind that can kill you?), it gets added to the list of things Hank wishes he didn’t have to worry about.  Scientists call it biofilm, and it’s a type of bacterial colony that produces a sticky organic glue which anchors the organisms to each other and to whatever surface they fancy. 

References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-381R

Biofilms! This is one of the topics I’m studying for my Infection and Immunity exam next week. (Last one of the semester, hooray!)

These are a huge problem in patient with Cystic Fibrosis and can make opportinistic bacterial infections like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which loves to infect medical devices like respirators and catheters, really difficult to treat.

And yes, be glad they didn’t include any pictures…

(Source: youtube.com, via scientiflix)

Filed under science biology bacteria biofilms education hank green